Category: Climate Policy

Gernot Wagner: The True Price of Carbon

For decades, economists have been wrestling with how best to weigh the current cost of emissions reductions against costs that will come years or even centuries from now. But a consensus has proved to be elusive, because traditional economic models don’t treat atmospheric carbon like an asset. Project Syndicate

A Cold War lesson for the climate change era: Why we need a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty

UN climate negotiations alone are unlikely to result in the rapid decarbonization that is needed. Now is the time for a new international treaty to get to the root of the problem, by addressing fossil fuel supply—with wealthy nations moving first and fastest. Drawing on the model of the nuclear treaty, a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty, like the nuclear treaty before it, would be constructed around three main pillars: non-proliferation, disarmament, and peaceful use. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Accelerating the Low Carbon Transition – The case for stronger, more targeted and coordinated international action

Stopping emissions requires fundamental innova-tion, rapid diffusion of new technologies, and the reshaping of markets and socioeconomic systems. This requires actions far beyond simply putting a price on carbon or adopting bold emissions goals. A more targeted, hands-on and strategic approach to policymaking is required to reconfigure the tech-nologies, business models, infrastructure and mar-kets in each of the greenhouse gas-emitting eco-nomic sectors. The Energy Transitions Commission

Why the Fed, Long Reticent, Has Started to Talk About Climate Change

An increase in severe weather events could lead to bank failures as property prices rapidly adjust, stoke uncertainty and harm economic growth. That makes global warming and its fallout relevant to the Fed, which is responsible for both financial regulation and for guiding the nation’s economy toward full employment and stable prices. New York Times

Exposed: Europe’s accounting tricks on energy savings

A growing number of EU member states are planning to use accounting tricks, including changes in fuel taxes introduced in the past, to claim “additional” energy savings as part of their EU climate obligations. EURACTIV