Energy, Climate, New Economic Thinking​

News

Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker

Governments are taking a wide range of measures to tackle the COVID-19 outbreak. We aim to track and compare worldwide government responses to the coronavirus rigorously and consistently. Systematic information on which measures governments take, and when, can help us understand the responses in a consistent way, aiding efforts to fight the pandemic. Our team collects information on common policy responses, scores the stringency of such measures, and aggregates these into a Stringency Index. University of Oxford, Blavatnik School of Government

Federal Report Warns of Financial Havoc From Climate Change

A report commissioned by federal regulators overseeing the nation’s commodities markets has concluded that climate change threatens U.S. financial markets, as the costs of wildfires, storms, droughts and floods spread through insurance and mortgage markets, pension funds and other financial institutions. New York Times

Our Final Warning: Six Degrees of Climate Emergency by Mark Lynas

If we stay on the current business-as-usual trajectory, we could see two degrees as soon as the early 2030s, three degrees around mid-century, and four degrees by 2075 or so. If we’re unlucky with positive feedbacks…from thawing permafrost in the Arctic or collapsing tropical rainforests, then we could be in for five or even six degrees by century’s end. New York Review of Books

BP Reports a Huge Loss and Vows to Increase Renewable Investment

What caught the attention of analysts and, apparently, investors, was the ambitious plan that Bernard Looney, the chief executive, set out for making over the London-based oil giant into a diversified purveyor of cleaner energy within a decade. On a webcast with analysts Mr. Looney described a transformation plan that Stuart Joyner, an analyst at the market research firm Redburn, said in a note to clients was “major, positive, thoughtful and largely unexpected.” New York Times

Climate 101: A crash course on climate change

This is a seven-day New York Times crash course on climate change, in which reporters from the Times’s Climate desk address the big questions: 1.How bad is climate change now? 2.How do scientists know what they know? 3.Who is influencing key decisions? 4.How do we stop fossil fuel emissions? 5.Do environmental rules matter? 6.Can insurance protect us? 7.Is what I do important? New York Times