Energy, Climate, New Economic Thinking​

Category: Politics and Society

Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker

Governments are taking a wide range of measures to tackle the COVID-19 outbreak. We aim to track and compare worldwide government responses to the coronavirus rigorously and consistently. Systematic information on which measures governments take, and when, can help us understand the responses in a consistent way, aiding efforts to fight the pandemic. Our team collects information on common policy responses, scores the stringency of such measures, and aggregates these into a Stringency Index. University of Oxford, Blavatnik School of Government

Business Leaders Commit to a Clean Economic Recovery

With pressure mounting in some quarters for a return to “normal,” there can be no delay in planning for the post-pandemic future. Unless the world’s leading businesses commit to rebuilding on an entirely new foundation, another global crisis will be inevitable. Project Syndicate

We’re not going back to normal

Social distancing is here to stay for much more than a few weeks. It will upend our way of life, in some ways forever. To stop coronavirus we will need to radically change almost everything we do: how we work, exercise, socialize, shop, manage our health, educate our kids, take care of family members. MIT Technology Review

Jeffrey Frankel: Will the Coronavirus Trigger a Global Recession?

The COVID-19 outbreak seems to have raised the odds of a global recession dramatically. But even if no downturn materializes in the near term, the outbreak, together with US President Donald Trump’s trade policy, may herald the end of the era when steadily rising international trade buttressed global peace and prosperity. Project Syndicate

Gernot Wagner: The True Price of Carbon

For decades, economists have been wrestling with how best to weigh the current cost of emissions reductions against costs that will come years or even centuries from now. But a consensus has proved to be elusive, because traditional economic models don’t treat atmospheric carbon like an asset. Project Syndicate